Landscape Photography

September 10, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

I'm always searching for new locations to capture landscape photography, it's this type of photography which I tend to frame and display on my walls at home, though I'm running out of wall space these days. 

I was fortunate enough to visit Iceland last year with my good friend Stuart (a fellow photographer) and the journey was incredible, taking in the sights of Pingvellir which sits in a rift valley between two tectonic plates, Kirkjufell the setting for Game of Thrones and the iconic church mountain, Gullfoss the incredibly huge waterfall and Skogafoss another incredibly tall waterfall where we were lucky enough to witness the northern lights. 

Unfortunately, the weather was less than ideal for the majority of the trip with rain, wind, fog and low cloud posing problems for us. However we did manage to capture some images that I'm extremely proud of and sit pride of place in my living room as a reminder of an incredible trip. 

I'm hoping to of return to Iceland again one day and continue the journey, there is so much to see and so many wonderful landscapes to take in, those who know me will be aware of my interest in in marine biology and I'd love to go whale watching when I return one day. This, along with the ice caves, Seljalandfoss, Godafoss and Reykjavik means there is so much more of Iceland to explore and I can imagine returning a couple more times at least.  

Earlier this year I visited London too with my daughter and again took in some landscape shots capturing the beauty of a place very different to Iceland but still a place I hold dear to my heart. My aunt and uncle used to take me to London regularly when I was younger and it was then I fell in love with old smoke, now as a proud father I like to take my daughter there regularly and she loves London too. 

When taking landscape shots personally I like to use a tripod as I often like to use a narrow aperture capturing as much detail as possible, this means I have a longer shutter speed to allow enough light into the sensor. This allows for a different look I like when it comes to water, in that the slow shutter records the movement of the water giving it a blurred look to the image. 

It was Tower Bridge where I tried the bracketing technique, you'll see these produced a HDR look combined with long exposures blurring the water in the Thames as it passes under Tower Bridge. 

The long exposure technique worked well from a different perspective too, as it captured passing traffic recording light trails taken on the bridge, for these shots I wanted to get a different perspective and used the actual bridge structure as a flat surface rather than a tripod. This gave a perspective I refer to as a 'pigeon eye view' as I can imagine this being a perch for them as they fly through the city lights.

I'm always looking for good landscapes to visit, so if you have any suggestions please do let me know, we love a little adventure out and capturing these beautiful locations. 

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